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The day I discovered my city...

The city where I live, I breathe, the one I grew up in………….. changed into a nightmarish view, the day  I started visiting the field for my PhD data collection. I never indulged myself to believe in any fairy tale rendition of my city, as I knew that it had its boons along with uncountable hitches. But nothing had prepared me for what awaited along those dark, tricky alleys...

Ethical dilemma

I am depressed!!!

 

The Elephants of Koraibari

Wherever we went and whoever I met in Koraibari had the same story – of elephants eating up their crops – maize and simla aloo (tapioca) during monsoons, vegetables in Winter and most important, their ripened paddy just before harvesting in January. They also say that this year, the elephants have been much more troublesome and persistent than previous years.   More people have settled in Koraibari in the recent decade – and more forests have been cleared. After the recent conflict in 2014, the number of households have also increased. The village also encourages people settling here as it means “having more numbers and being stronger as a unit”. Elephants and other animals have further lost their space in the jungle and the confrontation with human beings are increasing by the day.  

Man-Elephant Conflict in A Conflict Affected Area

Wherever we went and whoever I met in Koraibari had the same story – of elephants eating up their crops – maize and simla aloo (tapioca) during monsoons, vegetables in Winter and most important, their ripened paddy just before harvesting in January. They also say that this year, the elephants have been much more troublesome and persistent than previous years.   But then we have seen that more people have settled in Koraibari in the recent decade – and more forests have been cleared. After the recent conflict in 2014, the number of households have also increased. The village also encourages people settling here as it means “having more numbers and being stronger as a unit”. Elephants and other animals have further lost their space in the jungle and the confrontation with human beings are increasing by the day.  

Koraibari Field Notes from a Study on Health Inequities in a Conflict Area

Jennifer Liang is part of the research team of the ant, a partner in the study on Tribal Health Inequity as part of the Closing the gap: Health equity research initiative in India. The qualitative study done by the ant is in the style of a short ethnography using mainly in-depth interviews; observations; key informant interviews and group interviews to piece together the life-histories of different ethnic communities who have been affected by conflict and through all this to look at how the health and well-being of people has been affected by a long period of political conflict and repeated bouts of ethnic conflict. The study also looks at how the State Health Care system and its services has been affected by violent conflicts

Understanding Discrimination- How do we look at it?

“See they are discriminating against us” said my colleague as we were sitting in our canteen and waiting for our coffee. We had ordered first and the person who ordered after us got the coffee before we could get.

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